Surface Reconstruction

While making some serious progress on texturing scanned surfaces, we ran into need of a more decent surface reconstruction and decimation technique. Until now, exported meshes contained hundreds of thousands of triangles, adding unnecessary overhead in regions that could be expressed with just a couple of triangles (e.g planar regions). Additionally, we felt the need of closing small surface holes in order to allow smooth texturing across the surface.

Therefore we re-designed our surface reconstruction pipeline to support more sophisticated reconstruction techniques and a configurable surface decimation pipeline.

Below is an image that shows the original mesh as generated by the current version of ReMe (v. 0.6.0-405). It contains roughly 250.000 faces and one can clearly spot the holes that remained due to the lack of visibility of these areas while scanning.

In contrast, the next image shows a successful reconstruction of the original surface reduced to 50.000 faces with boundary holes closed.

Comparing both meshes using the Hausdorff distance gives an average distance of 0.8 mm. The image below colorizes the distances (blue low, red high).


Surface reconstruction isn’t limited to individual meshes, but can also be used to fusion multiple volumes into one single consistent mesh. The image below shows two individual stitched meshes using ReMe’s --multiscan feature.

Here is the fusioned mesh as generated by the development version of ReMe

Stay tuned!

10 thoughts on “Surface Reconstruction

  1. Marc

    This is incredible! Always implementing new features to facilitate the process and making it as easy as possible for users to scan objects. I’ve been using ReMe and a Kinect, and to get such impressive results for the price is amazing! Please keep doing what you guys are doing: making a future of easy 3D scanning a reality, because no one else is doing it ;) sorry for the over the top comment, but I think this is amazing software with unlimited potential, and hopefully it can be incorporated with the Leap :)

    Reply
    1. Christoph Heindl Post author

      Hi Marc, thanks for your words of encouragement. Happy users is what makes us happy.

      Best,
      Christoph

      Reply
    1. Christoph Heindl Post author

      Native port is not planned, but you can use Bootcamp or Parallels to get it run on Macs

      Reply
  2. John

    have only just started playing with ReMe in the last few days, and i am impressed, but these new changes are even better.
    fantastic work guys.

    Reply
  3. Bartus

    Nice nice!
    Less ressources, faster computing with the geometry, that is what we want.
    You doing a good job!
    You give it all away for free, but what we can do for you?
    What is what would make a Christoph Heindl happy? :)

    Reply

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